Healthcare Research

cultures of vol - front pageThis working paper details how the voluntary sector can improve their delivery of projects through a better understanding of the geographies of volunteering. We have identified how the Living Well healthcare project has evolved differentially across Cornwall with varying degrees of success. This paper argues that different local cultures of volunteering in Cornwall result in variance in the project delivery.

This working paper details how the voluntary sector can improve their delivery of projects through a better understanding of the geographies of volunteering. We have identified how the Living Well healthcare project has evolved differentially across Cornwall with varying degrees of success. This paper argues that different local cultures of volunteering in Cornwall result in variance in the project delivery.


reportA literature review on co-production which covers; the theoretical background, opportunities for co-production, and barriers to co-production.

s A literature review on co-production which covers; the theoretical background, opportunities for co-production, and barriers to co-production.literature review on co-production which covers; the theoretical background, Aopportunities for co-production, and barriers to co-production. •O pportunities for co-productionp

aper reviews the spaces for co-production in Living Well and the challenges and opportunities for delivering alternative models of co-production. Four key recommendations are made: greater emphasis of the importance of risk identification, effective integration of volunteers into opportunities for delivering alternative models of co-production. Fre maour key recommendations ade: greater emphasis of the importance of risk production. 


 

report 1This paper reviews the spaces for co-production in Living Well and the challenges and opportunities for delivering alternative models of co-production. Four key recommendations are made: greater emphasis of the importance of risk identification, effective integration of volunteers into multi-disciplinary team meetings, changes to the approaches of volunteer management and deployment, and the trialling of the attendance of medical staff to volunteer meetings in order to review potential benefits.

Several recommendations and follow-up recommendations for both the improvement and sustainability of Living Well are made.Several recommendations and follow-up recommendations fomade.Several recommendations and follow-up recommendations for both ther both the improvement and sustainability of Living Well are made


 

NESTA Report Cover PageIn 2015, commissioned by NESTA, we conducted a qualitative process evaluation of Living Well. This evaluation had 3 key aims: to explore the processes through which Living Well has been operationalised and embedded in Penwith, to examine how change has been achieved, and to discover what has been learned about developing the Living Well approach elsewhere. This document presents these findings, which are structured around the changes to three crucial aspects of health and social care delivery: referral, relationships, and routine. Several recommendations and follow-up recommendations for both the improvement and sustainability of Living Well are made. Several recommendations and follow-up recommendations for both the improvement and sustainability of Living Well are made.Several recommendations and follow-up recommendations for both the improvement and sustainability of Living Well are made.

 


2Our research on Living Well has been used as a case study in the RSA’s (Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) report on ‘Volunteering and Public Services – Where co-production meets localism’ (2015). The case study emphasises how the success of Living Well is underpinned by strong relationships between groups of healthcare practitioners, GPs, older people, volunteers, community groups, and Living Well Coordinators.

Several recommendations and follow-up recommendations for both the improvement and sustainability of Living Well are made.Several recommendations and follow-up recommendations for both the improvement and sustainability Several recommendations and follow-up recommendations for both the improvement and sustainability of Living Well are made.of Living Well are made.


report 2

This reports examines and reviews recruitment practices for Living Well, recommending updates to the current recruitment process. It identifies the requirements of a good advertising strategy, however the review of adverts on Do-It.org showed that Living Well advertising failed to meet many of these. Two key recommendations are made: that the existing expertise of the Brokerage Team at Volunteer Cornwall should be utilised to manage Living Well adverts; Volunteer Cornwall should conduct a Living Well recruitment campaign in partnership with Age UK, aiming to recruit from additional networks. Crucially, both of these recommendations have now been adopted by Age UK and Volunteer Cornwall.

Several recommendations and follow-up recommendations for both the improvement and sustainability of Living Well are made.


4

This report considers the growing social care and support needs of older people. State provision of social care is increasingly challenging in a period of austerity, therefore the engagement and recruitment of volunteers is essential. This report considers the development of Community Currency as an incentive for volunteering, and reviews best practice in other contexts. Part two focuses on Cornwall specifically, discussing contextual factors which may support or prevent the successful development of a Community Currency. Whilst all consulted stakeholders recognised and agreed upon its potential for addressing the social care crisis, seven obstacles were identified. These would need addressing in order to effectively implement a Community Currency scheme for Cornwall.


Academic Publications 

Moir E, Leyshon M (2013). The design of decision-making: Participatory budgeting and the production of localism. Local Environment.

Little JK, Leyshon M (2003). Embodied Rural Geographies: developing research agendas. Progress in Human Geography, 27(3), 257-272.

Leyshon M, Tverin T (2015). Bridging the generation gap: holidays, memory and identity in the countryside in Vanderbeck R, Worth N (eds.) Intergenerational Space, Abingdon: Routledge, 96-108.

Sanderson A, Leyshon M, Ostapenko-Denton A, Ostapenko-Denton K (2014). Social Enterprise and Social Capital: a Proposed Methodology for Developing Innovation and Entrepreneurship in a Deprived Cornish Peri-Urban Locality. , 393-400. Author URL